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Jerry Saw Opportunity Everywhere

Jerry Winstead reviewing supplies in Malawi

We met Jerry Winstead when he made his first trip to Malawi. He was a church elder and worked closely with Smith Howell, also an elder at the Goodman Oaks Church of Christ in Southaven, Mississippi. Both were committed supporters of the work in Malawi. Smith was older than Jerry and when we met, Smith…

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A NATION WALKING … AT LEAST FOR SOME!

People walking

Mbeya Village, Malawi … “I remember when we first arrived in Malawi two things that were most amazing to me,” observes Richard Stephens, a co-founder of the Malawi Project.  “One was the bamboo huts that constituted the homes of most of the village population, and second was the number of people walking. I later learned the average…

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IMPRESSIVE GATHERING, OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION

Key officials only were invited to avoid overcrowding

Lilongwe, Malawi … “I experienced an overwhelming shock when I saw patient after patient-facing infections from contamination in the very medical facilities they had entered for relief,” observes Suzi Stephens RN, the Malawi Project’s Medical Director. She recalls her 1993 exposure to Malawi’s medical situation, “I saw conditions that were often worse than those that had caused…

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RAIN, AS USUAL, BUT A WONDERFUL CHALLENGE

A 100 dollar bill

Lilongwe, Malawi — “A MORNING SHOWER”, “THUNDERSTORMS”, “MORNING RAINS”, “SHOWERS IN THE AFTERNOON”, “POSSIBLE STORMS”, “CLOUDY”, “RAIN”, … It’s that time of year in Malawi with rain predicted almost daily. Even I could be a reliable weather forecaster! For the next 5 months travel away from the main paved roads can be hazardous and should…

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IMAGINE CARRYING 39,000 LBS

Men unloading supplies from a truck in the rain

Lilongwe, Malawi … Imagine having to carry a trailer load of boxes totaling 39,000 pounds through the mud. Then imagine doing it in less than 2 hours. Thirty-Nine Thousand pounds is the total weight in many of the shipping containers going to Malawi. Two hours is the length of time the shipping firm allows for…

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TURNING OVER CEREMONY

Preparations for medical supply "Turning Over Ceremony" at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi

Blantyre, Malawi … It is a ceremony repeated over and over again. Each time medical, educational, or agricultural supplies arrive at a new location in Malawi, an event known as “the turning over ceremony,” takes place. Richard Stephens, of the Malawi Project recalls, “I thought at first this was sort of strange. We always had such…

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LENIYA HAS NEVER STOPPED

Leniya on her mobility unit holding a bible

Chalasikaopa Village, Malawi … Even though she was born with deformed legs, and has never walked, there are other things that include the word “never”. She has never been to school. She has never married. She has never stopped attending church services, she has never stopped running a small business, and she has never given up hope. Here name is Leniya Hebert, and she lives in…

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ACTION TO THE RESCUE

Mount Mulanje

Mulanje, Malawi … As the Covid-19 pandemic spreads rapidly across the nation, Action for Progress is trying to keep up with the demand by quickly delivering PPE, (Personal Protective Equipment), supplies to a number of hospitals. Faced with a critical shortage of these supplies, the medical personnel in Malawi must confront a possible disaster of…

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SUPPLIES FILL CRITICAL GAP

Supplies handover

Blantyre, Malawi … No sooner are current charts of anticipated and positive cases of the Coronavirus posted on the web site than they are obsolete, and the number has jumped upward. From April 1, when the first three cases appeared in the country, the run up has passed 30,000 suspected cases, and 4,000 confirmed cases.…

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TWELVE-HUNDRED MILE JOURNEY

Volunteers helping to load supplies

Indianapolis, Indiana … Over the years story after story have reflected the fortitude of the people of Malawi as they travel, often walking great distances. As the expression goes, “The road goes both directions,” meaning both sides in the equation have the same journey, just in opposite directions.  While Malawians travel long distances, the same was true…

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